Murder by Numbers, or, Why is everyone getting killed by their family?

Joan Peterson is adamant that
This is not true.  She goes on to add
Here’s where we see the man behind the curtain. Note the weasel words, “Where the victim-offender relationship could be identified.” That means if the relationship was unknown, they dropped them from the data pool. Does that make sense?
Let’s look at the last few years worth of FBI Uniform Crime Reports.  Click on the date to get the original in the FBI UCR reports for that year. Click the graph to embiggify.



2004 (scroll down for chart)



2005



2006



2007

2008

2009



 

Note the list of “Other Known” relationships that exist. Family is blood or marriage related. Friend, Boyfriend, Girlfriend, Neighbor, Employer, and Employee all have separate sub-categories. See how the sub-category of “Acquaintance” makes up the largest single sub-category? Who would be an “Acquaintance?” Basically, anyone you know for any reason that does not fit into another category. Your drug dealer, pimp, prostitute, or anyone else you know even slightly.
This is how the numbers are used to subtly lie to you. Instead of saying that, on average, somewhere between 15 and 18% of all murders are between family members or intimate partners, they claim that, X percentage “know each other.” This leads you to imagine that husbands are murdering their wives, kids are being slaughtered, and cousins are having duels at high noon in the streets.
Let’s look at the numbers in tabular form
Year
Husband
Wife
Mother
Father
Son
Daughter
Brother
Sister
Other Family
Total Family
2004
149
579
121
110
233
212
86
31
283
1804
2005
135
594
123
118
245
190
100
21
297
1823
2006
123
567
115
114
283
179
80
22
298
1781
2007
138
573
94
107
240
235
93
26
264
1770
2008
119
577
117
120
270
211
98
15
314
1841
2009
141
609
131
116
247
201
94
35
281
1855
Year
Acquaintance
Friend
Boyfriend
Girlfriend
Neighbor
Employee
Employer
Total Other Known
2004
3233
304
147
445
110
7
10
4256
2005
3210
324
152
461
86
4
6
4243
2006
3465
339
150
450
127
13
10
4554
2007
3061
483
150
471
110
5
9
4289
2008
3068
504
145
492
106
5
9
4329
2009
2941
404
138
472
132
12
20
4119
Year
Stranger
Unknown
Total
Family or Intimate Partner Percentage
2004
1827
6234
14121
16.97%
2005
2070
6724
14860
16.39%
2006
1905
6750
14990
15.88%
2007
1924
6848
14831
16.12%
2008
1742
6268
14180
17.48%
2009
1676
5986
13636
18.08%
The last column is labled “Family or Intimate Partner.” This includes boyfriends and girlfriends with all the “Family” numbers. As you can see, there is no way that “most” murders occur as a result of a domestic dispute.
Why do we care? When people use generalizations like, “Most homicides are among people who know each other,” they are attempting to create the impression in your mind that average people suddenly snap and become murderers. This is a lie, and a big one. The reason they lie like this is to make you believe that the average person cannot be trusted with a gun. If normal, average people suddenly snap and murder their families, then normal, average people cannot be trusted with guns.
The reality is murder is such a bad crime and so morally wrong that people rarely start out their criminal career by committing murder. They almost always work up to it. Ordinary, average citizens are not hotheads. They don’t commit murder just because they “lose their head.”
When people repeat this lie, they are insulting you and every other normal, average person. Don’t let it go unchallenged.

One Response to Murder by Numbers, or, Why is everyone getting killed by their family?

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