The Madison 5 win

The city says that they “admit no wrongdoing,” but don’t be fooled.
This is a big deal. $10K is chicken feed compared to what they could have lost in a Federal Civil Rights lawsuit, but it is not a slap on the wrist either. You can bet that the Chief of Police will be spending quite a bit of time reiterating to his officers that Open Carriers are not to be screwed with.
This incident was the fourth post on this blog. The incident was more than a year ago. This illustrates the patience you have to possess in order to see the change made in how police officers act. You can’t expect it to happen overnight. The wheels of justice grind slow, but they grind exceedingly fine.
We are winning

========================================================================
Do you RSS? Don’t know what an RSS Feed is?
Save time and read all the latest blog news first.

5 Responses to The Madison 5 win

  1. The problem though is that that $10,000 isn’t coming out of anyone’s personal pockets and thus, you won’t see this issue disappear completely.

    I love HB45 that was passed here in Florida. It makes those who violate preemption personally responsible. The speed at which these laws flew off the books was amazing.

  2. @Robb: I’ve pointed this out before, but once again, Florida points towards the future. Your law showed us something that we didn’t even know was possible. We are all guilty of self limiting thinking, because it never occurs to us to think outside of the narrow limits we have imposed upon ourselves. The Florida law made all of us slap ourselves on the head and say “Holy crap! Why didn’t we think of that?”

    You can rest assured that you will get many imitators. GRNC has been freely threatening people with passing this same exact law here in North Carolina.

  3. Minor Point, but I’m assuming that it was $10,000 total, not $10K a head, right? Granted, no City likes to shell out that kinda cash when they lose, but it could’ve been $10,000 apiece. But if you subtract the lawyer’s fees, Court Costs, lose of Revenue, etc. I don’t think those 5 guys recouped their loses. But they won a Battle for the RKBA.

    BTW, just read your CHP post at Weerd’s yesterday. Been some recent changes to Ohio CCW Laws and Reciprocity, and we are now up to 22 States. I know that North Carolina and Florida is on the List, so you might want to re-think dropping Florida. Nothing like the look on some of the County Mounties faces up here when you can say ” and the State of Ohio has Reciprocity with BOTH States, so I’m more than covered under Ohio Law, Officer.”

    Heck, you might be able to make some cash if they try to go “Officer Harliss” on you, because Video Taping the Cops is Protected under Ohio State Law.

    Merry Christmas!

  4. “Chief of Police will be spending quite a bit of time reiterating to his officers that Open Carriers are not to be screwed with”.

    I wouldn’t bet on it. It is after all Moscow of the Midwest. The Chief and every member of the city council are rabidly anti-gun. They will find a way to harass gun owners.

  5. @Bubblehead Les: yep, $10K total, not each. It’ll cover costs, and give them a couple of bucks each to go back to the same restaurant to eat dinner. You’re right, the important thing was the win for our rights, not the money.

    Since NC covers Ohio, Florida isn’t necessary. If the Canton Commando won’t accept my NC CHP, I don’t see how he’d accept my Florida one. I do have until June of 2016 to decide though.

    @Robert Fowler: I don’t know. There will always be hard cases, but remember that the settlement hinges on the Madison 5 taking it as a settlement that includes all the officers involved. That means that the officers were personally named. What PA did was mandate Open Carry training. If the Madison bunch was smart, they will insist on documented OC training for the department. Lots of cops will push the envelope if they are convinced that the department will cover for them. Few will try once they realize that documented training makes them personally liable. They can’t claim that they didn’t know.