Monthly Archives: March 2013

Who wants to counterprotest a MAIG anti-gun rally in Raleigh TODAY?

MAIG is running their anti-gun “day of action” garbage today. Sadly, I didn’t know about this beforehand.

Who would like to join me counterprotesting?

Sign suggestions

  • Nanny Bloomberg should take his billions and go home to NYC
  • If MAIG wants background checks, they should start by checking themselves!
  • (for children) My mommy’s (or daddy’s) gun protects me
  • Guns save Lives!
  • I’m Pro-Choice on Self-Defense

I’m on Twitter at @sdsorrentino. Send me email at [email protected] \

Meet me there!

I’ll bet he wasn’t hard to identify

The gun grabbers are grabbing their dancing shoes. Another violent death with a gun.

A Lumberton man is accused of shooting two men, one fatally, during a robbery attempt Sunday in Maxton, the Robeson County Sheriff’s Office said Thursday

Only one victim is known to be a criminal, and that was a long time ago.

Victim 2

There’s nothing in the NC Department of Corrections database about the shooter. But there is this

(Suspect) has an extensive criminal record, Thompson said, including pending robbery charges.

Better put down those dancing shoes, gun haters. And check out the mug shot. I’ll bet that it didn’t take long to identify him in the lineup.

They come from all over to steal

I think we have enough criminals.

Over the weekend officers arrested a man suspected of breaking into a car in the Plaza Midwood area.

And what makes him so special?

Suspect

He’s here on probation from Arizona.

Perhaps if he can’t be bothered to keep his hands off other people’s stuff we could send him back. They’ve got enough desert there that they could find him a place where there’s nothing to steal. Perhaps a place with an anthill to sit on and no water to drink.

I get to share air time with Mark Serbu on Voice of Russia Radio

When Serbu posted their email exchange with NYPD Firearms and Tactics division, they gave teeth to the growing New York Boycott. It was the first time that we had concrete proof that a boycotting company had refused an actual firearm transfer to the NYPD.

Today I was interviewed by Vasily Sushko of Voice of Russia, along with Mark Serbu himself.

Interview with Vasily Sushko, Voice of Russia

Here’s a link to the actual story.

NEW YORK – Law enforcement agencies in New York may find it more difficult to purchase weapons following the passing of the New York Safe Act earlier this year.

Thanks Vasily.

Other news organizations that want to talk about the New York Boycott can contact me at [email protected]

S443 – Abandoned Firearms to State Control

Title: Abandoned Firearms to State Control

Primary Sponsors: Andrew C. Brock

First Edition Text:  

A BILL TO BE ENTITLED

AN ACT to transfer abandoned firearms from local law enforcement agencies to the state for disposition.

The General Assembly of North Carolina enacts:

SECTION 1. G.S. 15‑11.2 reads as rewritten:

“§ 15‑11.2. Disposition of unclaimed firearms not confiscated or seized as trial evidence.

(a) Definition. – For purposes of this section, the term “unclaimed firearm” means a firearm that is found or received by a law enforcement agency and that remains unclaimed by the person who may be entitled to it for a period of 30 days after the publication of the notice required by subsection (b) of this section. The term does not include a firearm that is seized and disposed of pursuant to G.S. 15‑11.1 or a firearm that is confiscated and disposed of pursuant to G.S. 14‑269.1.

(b) Published Notice of Unclaimed Firearm. – When a law enforcement agency finds or receives a firearm and the firearm remains unclaimed for a period of 180 days, the agency shall publish at least one notice in a newspaper published in the county in which the agency is located. The notice shall include all of the following:

(1) A statement that the firearm is unclaimed and is in the custody of the law enforcement agency.

(2) A statement that the firearm may be sold or otherwise disposed of unless the firearm is claimed within 30 days of the date of the publication of the notice.

(3) A brief description of the firearm and any other information that the chief or head of the law enforcement agency may consider necessary or advisable to reasonably inform the public about the firearm.

(c) If the firearm remains unclaimed for a period of 30 days after the publication of the notice, then the person who found the firearm and turned it over to the law enforcement agency may claim the firearm provided the person satisfies the custodial law enforcement agency holding the firearm that the person is qualified under State and federal law to possess the firearm and also presents a pistol permit issued in accordance with Article 52A of Chapter 14 of the General Statutes.

(d) If the firearm remains unclaimed for a period of 30 days after the publication of the notice and the person who found the firearm does not claim it as provided by subsection (c) of this section, notice, then the head or chief of the law enforcement agency shall transfer the firearm to the State Bureau of Investigation (SBI).may apply to the appropriate district court for an order of disposition of the unclaimed firearm. The application shall be written.

(e) Disposition of Firearm. – The SBI, in the discretion of the agency Director, judge, after hearing, may order the disposition shall dispose of the firearm in one of the following ways:

(1) By ordering the firearm turned over to be having the firearm destroyed if the firearm does not have a legible, unique identification number, or is unsafe for use because of wear, damage, age, or modification, and will not be disposed of pursuant to subdivision (3) of this subsection. The SBI shall destroyed by the sheriff of the county in which the law enforcement agency applying for the order of disposition is located or by the sheriff’s duly authorized agent. The sheriff shall maintain a record of the destruction of the firearm.

(2) By ordering transferring the firearm turned over to the to (i) a law enforcement agency applying for the disposition of the firearm for (i) the official use of the agency or (ii) sale, trade, or exchange by the agency by selling the firearm at a public auction to persons licensed as firearms collectors, dealers, importers, or manufacturers to a federally licensed firearm dealer in accordance with all applicable State and federal firearm laws. The court may order a disposition SBI shall dispose of the firearm pursuant to this subsection subdivision only if the firearm has a legible, unique identification number.

(3) By maintaining the firearm for training or experimental purposes or transferring the firearm to a museum or historical society.

(f) Disbursement of Proceeds of Sale. – If the law enforcement agency SBI sells the firearm, firearm pursuant to subdivision (2) of subsection (e) of this section, then the proceeds of the sale shall be retained by the law enforcement agency SBI and used for law enforcement purposes. The receiving law enforcement agency SBI shall maintain a record and inventory of all firearms received from local law enforcement agencies pursuant to this section.section, as well as the disposition of the firearm, including any funds received from a sale of a firearm or any firearms or other property received in exchange or trade of a firearm.”

SECTION 2. This act becomes effective July 1, 2013, and applies to any firearm found or received by a local law enforcement agency on or after that date.

My take: This sounds like a good bill. The purpose of this bill is to centralize all the firearms found or turned in to police as found. It does not apply to firearms seized by police or to firearms held in evidence. I don’t know how many “found” firearms there are, but any that exist would be transferred to the SBI and either destroyed (if they don’t have a serial number), sold to dealers/manufacturers, or held for the use of the crime lab. 

My recommendation: SUPPORT

To see all the proposed gun related bills in the NC General Assembly for the 2013-2014 session, Click HERE

H17 – Gun Permits/Confidentiality – Passes House 97-20, on to Senate

Bill Name: Gun Permits/Confidentiality

Primary Sponsors: Burr, Hagar, Hollo, and J. Bell

Edition 2 Text

A BILL TO BE ENTITLED

AN ACT to allow persons with concealed handgun permits to possess handguns in restaurants and eating establishments if not prohibited by the posting of a notice prohibiting possession on the premises and to provide for the confidentiality of information regarding concealed handgun permits and pistol purchase permits.

The General Assembly of North Carolina enacts:

SECTION 1. G.S. 14‑415.17 reads as rewritten:

“§ 14‑415.17. Permit; sheriff to retain and make available to law enforcement agencies a list of permittees.permittees; confidentiality of list and permit application information; availability to law enforcement agencies.

(a) The permit shall be in a certificate form, as prescribed by the Administrative Office of the Courts, that is approximately the size of a North Carolina drivers license. It shall bear the signature, name, address, date of birth, and the drivers license identification number used in applying for the permit.

(b) The sheriff shall maintain a listing, including the identifying information, of those persons who are issued a permit. The permit information shall be available upon request to all State and local law enforcement agencies. Within five days of the date a permit is issued, the sheriff shall send a copy of the permit to the State Bureau of Investigation. The State Bureau of Investigation shall make this information available to law enforcement officers and clerks of court on a statewide system.

(c) Except as provided otherwise by this subsection, the list of permit holders and the information collected by the sheriff to process an application for a permit are confidential and are not a public record under G.S. 132‑1. The sheriff shall make the list of permit holders and the permit information available upon request to all State and local law enforcement agencies. The State Bureau of Investigation shall make the list of permit holders and the information collected by the sheriff to process an application for a permit available to law enforcement officers and clerks of court on a statewide system.”

SECTION 2. G.S. 14‑405 reads as rewritten:

“§ 14‑405. Record of permits kept by sheriff.sheriff; confidentiality of permit information.

(a) The sheriff shall keep a book, to be provided by the board of commissioners of each county, in which he shall keep a record of all licenses or permits issued under this article, including the name, date, place of residence, age, former place of residence, etc., of each such person, firm, or corporation to whom or which a license or permit is issued.

(b) The records maintained by the sheriff pursuant to this section are confidential and are not a public record under G.S. 132‑1; provided, however, that the sheriff shall make the records available upon request to all State and local law enforcement agencies.”

SECTION 3. G.S. 14‑406 reads as rewritten:

“§ 14‑406. Dealer to keep record of sales. sales; confidentiality of records.

(a) Every dealer in pistols and other weapons mentioned in this Article shall keep an accurate record of all sales thereof, including the name, place of residence, date of sale, etc., of each person, firm, or corporation to whom or which such sales are made, which record shall be open to the inspection of any duly constituted State, county or police officer, within this State.made. The records maintained by a dealer pursuant to this section are confidential and are not a public record under G.S. 132‑1; provided, however, that the dealer shall make the records available upon request to all State and local law enforcement agencies.

(b) Repealed by Session Laws 2011‑56, s. 3, effective April 28, 2011.”

SECTION 4. This act becomes effective December 1, 2013.

My Take: This bill originally had Restaurant Carry. It no longer has it. There is a tiny technical amendment added that adds “and clerks of court” to the list of people authorized access to the CHP database. This makes sense.

Sections 1, 2, & 3 make Concealed Handgun Permits and Pistol Purchase Permits, and Dealer Records of Sale into confidential records. Newspapers and other nosy people can’t get your private info and publish it anymore

Section 4 says this all goes into effect on December 1, 2013. December 1 is the traditional date for new legislation to take effect in North Carolina.

My recommendation: SUPPORT

To see all the proposed gun related bills in the NC General Assembly for the 2013-2014 session, Click HERE

Counterfeit rifle parts siezed in Cary, NC

You can bet that the anti-gun forces are going to spin out of control on this one.

A secretary of state’s investigator, working with U.S. Homeland Security agents, seized 1,559 mostly counterfeit Chinese parts for rifle accessories when they raided a Cary home earlier this month, according to a search warrant made public Tuesday.

So what exactly did they sieze from a home in the Containment Area for Relocated Yankees?

Inside, Davis told Manning, were parts marked as coming from A.R.M.S., Inc., a Massachusetts company that makes equipment for mounting sighting scopes on rifles, particularly the M-16/M-4 military assault rifles and the AR-15 civilian equivalent.

Davis contacted the company, and a senior executive there pronounced the seized mounts to be counterfeit, Davis said.

In the garage at Daybreak Bluff Drive, the returned warrant says, agents found an array of telescopic sights, mounting equipment for sights, several flashlights marked as known brands that can be mounted on rifles for tactical use and other gun grips, butts, butt pads, bipods for supporting the barrel in precise shooting situations and other gear.

It sounds like a bunch of stuff that wouldn’t be interesting except it can be attached to a rifle. If it was counterfeit doggie chew toys it would be more dangerous, but probably wouldn’t be reported in the press.

Here’s a scary one

When someone kicks in your door, even if all he wants is your property, it’s a scary event. So scary, in fact, that NC law says you are presumed to be in reasonable fear for your life.

Police say that Marc Robert Kirkpatrick, 27, rang the door bell of the home on Thursday morning. When no one answered the door, Kirkpatrick went around back and forced open the back door. While he was inside he heard the homeowner’s voice and then fled the scene with the homeowner’s property in tow.

Luckily he ran this time. Last time he didn’t run

Suspect

You can see that his most recent conviction was for two counts of Breaking and Entering, along with a count of drug possession and a count of Assault on a Female. Note that the incidents are all on the same day. We can only assume that in the course of one of his break ins he attacked a woman.

Yet for all that, plus a separate charge of Assault on a Female, he was sentenced to 8 to 10 months in prison and served 4.

S410 – Enabling Heroes Act of 2013 – Or NC Constitutional Carry

This bill is NC’s Constitutional Carry bill.

Title: Enabling Heroes Act of 2013

Primary Sponsors: Jeff Tarte, Shirley B. Randleman, Andrew C. Brock

First Edition Text:  

A BILL TO BE ENTITLED

AN ACT to enhance the ability of lawful citizens of north carolina to protect themselves, children, and others from criminals and violent sociopaths by amending laws that prohibit carrying of concealed weapons and weapons on educational property.

The General Assembly of North Carolina enacts:

SECTION 1. G.S. 14‑269 is repealed.

SECTION 2. Article 35 of Chapter 14 of the General Statutes is amended by adding a new section to read:

“§ 14‑269A. Carrying concealed weapons.

No person shall carry concealed about his or her person any deadly weapon for any illegal purpose. Any person violating the provisions of this section shall be guilty of a Class 2 misdemeanor for the first offense. A second or subsequent offense is punishable as a Class I felony.”

SECTION 3. G.S. 14‑269.2 reads as rewritten:

“§ 14‑269.2. Weapons on campus or other educational property.

(a) The following definitions apply to this section:

(1) Educational property. – Any school building or bus, school campus, grounds, recreational area, athletic field, or other property owned, used, or operated by any board of education or school board of trustees, or directors for the administration of any school.school, excluding any property that is not used primarily for educational purposes.

(1a) Employee. – A person employed by a local board of education or school whether the person is an adult or a minor.

(1b) School. – A public or private school, community college, college, or university.

(2) Student. – A person enrolled in a school or a person who has been suspended or expelled within the last five years from a school, whether the person is an adult or a minor.

(3) Switchblade knife. – A knife containing a blade that opens automatically by the release of a spring or a similar contrivance.

(4) Weapon. – Any device enumerated in subsection (b), (b1), or (d) of this section.

(b) It shall be a Class I felony for any person knowingly to possess or carry, whether openly or concealed, any gun, rifle, pistol, or other firearm of any kind on educational property or to a curricular or extracurricular activity sponsored by a school. Unless the conduct is covered under some other provision of law providing greater punishment, any person who willfully discharges a firearm of any kind on educational property is guilty of a Class F felony. However, this subsection does not apply to a to any of the following:

(1) A BB gun, stun gun, air rifle, or air pistol.

(2) A person not participating in curricular or extracurricular events held at places other than educational property.

(b1) It shall be a Class G felony for any person to possess or carry, whether openly or concealed, any dynamite cartridge, bomb, grenade, mine, or powerful explosive as defined in G.S. 14‑284.1, on educational property or to a curricular or extracurricular activity sponsored by a school. This subsection shall not apply to fireworks.

(c) It shall be a Class I felony for any person to cause, encourage, or aid a minor who is less than 18 years old to possess or carry, whether openly or concealed, any gun, rifle, pistol, or other firearm of any kind on educational property. However, this subsection does not apply to a BB gun, stun gun, air rifle, or air pistol.

(c1) It shall be a Class G felony for any person to cause, encourage, or aid a minor who is less than 18 years old to possess or carry, whether openly or concealed, any dynamite cartridge, bomb, grenade, mine, or powerful explosive as defined in G.S. 14‑284.1 on educational property. This subsection shall not apply to fireworks.

(d) It shall be a Class 1 misdemeanor for any person to possess or carry, whether openly or concealed, any BB gun, stun gun, air rifle, air pistol, bowie knife, dirk, dagger, slungshot, leaded cane, switchblade knife, blackjack, metallic knuckles, razors and razor blades (except solely for personal shaving), firework, or any sharp‑pointed or edged instrument except instructional supplies, unaltered nail files and clips and tools used solely for preparation of food, instruction, and maintenance, on educational property.

(e) It shall be a Class 1 misdemeanor for any person to cause, encourage, or aid a minor who is less than 18 years old to possess or carry, whether openly or concealed, any BB gun, stun gun, air rifle, air pistol, bowie knife, dirk, dagger, slungshot, leaded cane, switchblade knife, blackjack, metallic knuckles, razors and razor blades (except solely for personal shaving), firework, or any sharp‑pointed or edged instrument except instructional supplies, unaltered nail files and clips and tools used solely for preparation of food, instruction, and maintenance, on educational property.

(f) Notwithstanding subsection (b) of this section it shall be a Class 1 misdemeanor rather than a Class I felony for any person to possess or carry, whether openly or concealed, any gun, rifle, pistol, or other firearm of any kind, on educational property or to a curricular or extracurricular activity sponsored by a school if:

(1) The person is not a student attending school on the educational property or an employee employed by the school working on the educational property; and

(1a) The person is not a student attending a curricular or extracurricular activity sponsored by the school at which the student is enrolled or an employee attending a curricular or extracurricular activity sponsored by the school at which the employee is employed; and

(2) Repealed by Session Laws 1999‑211, s. 1, effective December 1, 1999, and applicable to offenses committed on or after that date.

(3) The firearm is not loaded, is in a motor vehicle, and is in a locked container or a locked firearm rack.

(4) Repealed by Session Laws 1999‑211, s. 1, effective December 1, 1999, and applicable to offenses committed on or after that date.

(g) This section shall not apply to any of the following:

(1) A weapon used solely for educational or school‑sanctioned ceremonial purposes, or used in a school‑approved program conducted under the supervision of an adult whose supervision has been approved by the school authority.

(1a) A person exempted by the provisions of G.S. 14‑269(b).

(2) Firefighters, emergency service personnel, and North Carolina Forest Service personnel, and any private police employed by a school, when acting in the discharge of their official duties.

(3) Home schools as defined in G.S. 115C‑563(a).

(4) Weapons used for hunting purposes on the Howell Woods Nature Center property in Johnston County owned by Johnston Community College when used with the written permission of Johnston Community College or for hunting purposes on other educational property when used with the written permission of the governing body of the school that controls the educational property.

(5) A person registered under Chapter 74C of the General Statutes as an armed armored car service guard or an armed courier service guard when acting in the discharge of the guard’s duties and with the permission of the college or university.

(6) A person registered under Chapter 74C of the General Statutes as an armed security guard while on the premises of a hospital or health care facility located on educational property when acting in the discharge of the guard’s duties with the permission of the college or university.

(7) A person who possesses or carries a handgun if the person has been issued a concealed handgun permit in accordance with Article 54B of this Chapter.

(8) Officers and enlisted personnel of the Armed Forces of the United States when in discharge of their official duties as such and acting under orders requiring them to carry arms and weapons.

(9) Civil and law enforcement officers of the United States.

(10) Officers and soldiers of the militia and the National Guard when called into actual service.

(11) Officers of the State, or of any county, city, town, or company police agency charged with the execution of the laws of the State, when acting in the discharge of their official duties.

(12) Any person who is a district attorney, an assistant district attorney, or an investigator employed by the office of a district attorney and who has a concealed handgun permit issued in accordance with Article 54B of this Chapter or considered valid under G.S. 14‑415.24; provided that the person shall not carry a concealed weapon at any time while in a courtroom or while consuming alcohol or an unlawful controlled substance or while alcohol or an unlawful controlled substance remains in the person’s body. The district attorney, assistant district attorney, or investigator shall secure the weapon in a locked compartment when the weapon is not on the person of the district attorney, assistant district attorney, or investigator.

(13) Any person who meets all of the following conditions:

a. Is a qualified retired law enforcement officer as defined in G.S. 14‑415.10.

b. Is the holder of a concealed handgun permit in accordance with Article 54B of this Chapter.

c. Is certified by the North Carolina Criminal Justice Education and Training Standards Commission pursuant to G.S. 14‑415.26.

(1) Detention personnel or correctional officers employed by the State or a unit of local government who park a vehicle in a space that is authorized for their use in the course of their duties may transport a firearm to the parking space and store that firearm in the vehicle parked in the parking space, provided that (i) the firearm is in a closed compartment or container within the locked vehicle or (ii) the firearm is in a locked container securely affixed to the vehicle.

(15) Sworn law enforcement officers, when off‑duty, provided that an officer does not carry a concealed weapon while consuming alcohol or an unlawful controlled substance or while alcohol or an unlawful controlled substance remains in the officer’s body.

(16) State probation or parole certified officers, when off‑duty, provided that an officer does not carry a concealed weapon while consuming alcohol or an unlawful controlled substance or while alcohol or an unlawful controlled substance remains in the officer’s body.

(h) No person shall be guilty of a criminal violation of this section with regard to the possession or carrying of a weapon so long as both of the following apply:

(1) The person comes into possession of a weapon by taking or receiving the weapon from another person or by finding the weapon.

(2) The person delivers the weapon, directly or indirectly, as soon as practical to law enforcement authorities.”

SECTION 4. This act becomes effective December 1, 2013, and applies to offenses committed on or after that date.

My take: This is a Constitutional Carry law.

Section 1. The first part repeals 14-269, the concealed weapon statute.

Section 2. This rewrites the concealed weapon statute to say that it is a crime to carry a concealed weapon “for any illegal purpose.” Since self defense is not illegal, you can carry without a license.

Section 3. This is lawful concealed carry on educational property. This imports all the exemptions to the old concealed carry law, allowing them to still carry on school property, but includes anyone with a Concealed Handgun Permit. The screaming that this bill will produce will be legendary.

My recommendation: SUPPORT!

To see all the proposed gun related bills in the NC General Assembly for the 2013-2014 session, Click HERE

S408 – Lawful Citizens Self Protection Act

Title: Lawful Citizens Self Protection Act

Primary Sponsors: Jeff Tarte, Shirley B. Randleman, Andrew C. Brock

First Edition Text:  

A BILL TO BE ENTITLED

AN ACT to EXPAND AREAS IN WHICH LAWFUL CONCEALED HANDGUN PERMIT HOLDERS MAY CARRY OR KEEP FIREARMS FOR SELF PROTECTION.

The General Assembly of North Carolina enacts:

SECTION 1. G.S. 14‑269.3 reads as rewritten:

“§ 14‑269.3. Carrying weapons into assemblies and establishments where alcoholic beverages are sold and consumed.

(a) It shall be unlawful for any person to carry any gun, rifle, or pistol into any assembly where a fee has been charged for admission thereto, or thereto. This subsection shall not apply to a person who has a concealed handgun permit issued in accordance with Article 54B of this Chapter or considered valid under G.S. 14‑415.24.

(a1) It shall be unlawful for any person to carry any gun, rifle, or pistol into any establishment in which alcoholic beverages are sold and consumed.

(a2) Any person violating the provisions of this section shall be guilty of a Class 1 misdemeanor.

(b) This section shall not apply to the following:

(1) A person exempted from the provisions of G.S. 14‑269;

(2) The owner or lessee of the premises or business establishment;

(3) A person participating in the event, if he is carrying a gun, rifle, or pistol with the permission of the owner, lessee, or person or organization sponsoring the event; and

(4) A person registered or hired as a security guard by the owner, lessee, or person or organization sponsoring the event.event; and

(5) A person on the premises of an eating establishment as defined in G.S. 18B‑1000(2) or a restaurant as defined in G.S. 18B‑1000(6), provided the person has a concealed handgun permit issued in accordance with Article 54B of this Chapter or considered valid under G.S. 14‑415.24. This subdivision shall not be construed to permit a person to carry a concealed handgun on the premises of an eating establishment or a restaurant where the person in legal possession or control of the premises has posted a conspicuous notice prohibiting the carrying of a concealed handgun on the premises in accordance with G.S. 14‑415.11(c).”

SECTION 2. G.S. 14‑277.2(c) reads as rewritten:

“(c) The provisions of this section shall not apply to any of the following:

(1) a Any person exempted by the provisions of G.S. 14‑269(b) or 14‑269(b); or

(2) to persons Any person authorized by State or federal law to carry dangerous weapons in the performance of their the person’s duties or duties; or

(3) to any Any person who obtains a permit to carry a dangerous weapon at a parade, funeral procession, picket line, or demonstration from the sheriff or police chief, whichever is appropriate, of the locality where such parade, funeral procession, picket line, or demonstration is to take place.place; or

(4) Any person who has a concealed handgun permit issued in accordance with Article 54B of this Chapter or considered valid under G.S. 14‑415.24.”

SECTION 3. Article 53B of Chapter 14 of the General Statutes is amended by adding a new section to read:

“§ 14‑409.41. No prohibition regarding the transportation or storage of a firearm in locked motor vehicle by business, commercial enterprise, or employer; civil liability; enforcement.

(a) As used in this section, the term “motor vehicle” means any automobile, truck, minivan, sports utility vehicle, motorcycle, motor scooter, and any other vehicle required to be registered under Chapter 20 of the General Statutes.

(b) A business, commercial enterprise, or employer shall not establish, maintain, or enforce a policy or rule that prohibits or has the effect of prohibiting a person from transporting or storing any firearm or ammunition when the person has a permit issued in accordance with Article 54B of this Chapter or that is valid under G.S. 14‑415.24, is otherwise in compliance with all other applicable laws and regulations, and the firearm or ammunition is in a closed compartment or container within the person’s locked vehicle or in a locked container securely affixed to the person’s vehicle. A person may unlock the vehicle to enter or exit the vehicle provided the firearm or ammunition remain in the closed compartment at all times and the vehicle is locked immediately following the entrance or exit.

(c) Subsection (b) of this section shall not apply to the following:

(1) Vehicles owned or leased by an employer.

(2) Where transport or storage of a firearm is prohibited by State or federal law or regulation.

(d) A person who is injured or incurs damages, or the survivors of a person killed, as a result of a violation of subsection (b) of this section, may bring a civil action in the appropriate court against any business entity, commercial enterprise, or employer who committed or caused such violation. A person who would be entitled legally to transport or store a firearm or ammunition, but who would be denied the ability to transport or store a firearm or ammunition by a policy in violation of subsection (b) of this section, may bring a civil action in the appropriate court to enjoin any business entity, commercial enterprise, or employer from violating subsection (b) of this section.

(e) An employee discharged by an employer, business entity, or commercial enterprise for violation of a policy or rule prohibited under subsection (b) of this section, when he or she was lawfully transporting or storing a firearm out of plain sight in a locked motor vehicle, is entitled to full recovery as specified in subdivisions (1) through (4) of this subsection, inclusive. If the demand for the recovery is denied, the employee may bring a civil action in the courts of this State against the employer, business entity, or commercial enterprise and is entitled to the following:

(1) Reinstatement to the same position held at the time of his or her termination from employment, or to an equivalent position.

(2) Reinstatement of the employee’s full fringe benefits and seniority rights, as appropriate.

(3) Compensation, if appropriate, for lost wages, benefits, or other lost remuneration caused by the termination.

(4) Payment of reasonable attorneys’ fees and legal costs incurred.

(f) A business, commercial enterprise, employer, or property owner that allows persons to transport or store any firearm or ammunition pursuant to subsection (b) of this section shall have complete immunity and shall not be held liable in any civil action for damages, injuries, or death resulting from or arising out of another person’s actions involving a firearm or ammunition transported or stored in accordance with this section, including, but not limited to, the theft of a firearm from an employee’s automobile. Nothing contained in this section shall create a new duty on the part of any business, commercial enterprise, employer, or property owner. This section shall not be construed to permit a person to possess a firearm outside of a motor vehicle while on the premises of a place of employment where the person in legal possession or control of the premises has posted a conspicuous notice prohibiting possession of a firearm on the premises.

(g) In any action relating to the enforcement of any right or obligation under subsections (d) and (e) of this section, the reasonable, good‑faith efforts of a business, commercial enterprise, employer, or property owner to comply with other applicable and irreconcilable federal or State safety laws or regulations shall be a complete defense to any liability of the business, commercial enterprise, employer, or property owner.”

SECTION 4. G.S. 14‑415.23 reads as rewritten:

“§ 14‑415.23. Statewide uniformity.

It is the intent of the General Assembly to prescribe a uniform system for the regulation of legally carrying a concealed handgun. To insure uniformity, no political subdivisions, boards, or agencies of the State nor any county, city, municipality, municipal corporation, town, township, village, nor any department or agency thereof, may enact ordinances, rules, or regulations concerning legally carrying a concealed handgun. A unit of local government may adopt an ordinance to permit the posting of a prohibition against carrying a concealed handgun, in accordance with G.S. 14‑415.11(c), on local government buildings and their appurtenant premises. A unit of local government may adopt an ordinance to prohibit, by posting, the carrying of a concealed handgun on municipal and county recreational facilities that are specifically identified by the unit of local government. If a unit of local government adopts such an ordinance with regard to recreational facilities, then the concealed handgun permittee may, nevertheless, secure the handgun in a locked vehicle within the trunk, glove box, or other enclosed compartment or area within or on the motor vehicle. For purposes of this section, the term “recreational facilities” includes only the following: a playground, an athletic field, a swimming pool, and an athletic facility. Recreational facilities shall not be construed to include areas of passive recreation such as picnic areas, shelters, restroom facilities, walkways, hiking trails, greenways, and lakes, nor shall this section be interpreted to prohibit firearms in entire parks which contain recreational facilities.”

SECTION 5. This act becomes effective December 1, 2013.

My take: By section

Section 1. This makes it legal for anyone with a Concealed Handgun Permit to carry a handgun into a restaurant that serves alcohol and to a place that charges admission, such as a theater.

Section 2. This make is legal for a person who has a Concealed Handgun Permit to carry a handgun during parades, pickets, and demonstrations. It’s a strange fact that it is a crime in North Carolina to watch the Christmas parade while carrying a firearm.

Section 3. This is a parking lot bill. It bars your employer from firing you if you keep a gun locked in your car in the parking lot at work. I also removes liability from the employer for misuse of a gun if they allow you to leave the gun while making them responsible for anything that happens to you if they ban guns.

Section 4. This modifies Park carry to prevent some of the stupid things that cities and towns are doing. They’re pretending that walking trails and in one memorable case, an entire lake, are “recreation facilities.” How you declare an entire lake to be a “swimming pool” I don’t know, but one place did it.

Section 5. This says all the above laws take effect on December 1, 2013.

My recommendation: SUPPORT

To see all the proposed gun related bills in the NC General Assembly for the 2013-2014 session, Click HERE